2016-12-13 Lightning Talks

Join us on Tuesday, December 13, 2016 at The Fox & Feather Pub and Grill for an unplugged CapCHI meetup! We’re moving away from our usual format and bringing you a more casual night of Lightning Talks!

Date: Tuesday December 13th, 2016.

Time: doors open at 6:00 pm; presentations begins at 6:30 pm.

Place: Upstairs room (3rd floor) at The Fox & Feather Pub and Grill, located at 283 Elgin St, Ottawa, ON, Canada (foxandfeather.ca).

Registration (Free!): We request that you pre-register via Eventbrite, but it is not required to attend… https://www.eventbrite.com/e/capchi-event-lightning-talks-tickets-29650716090

Join us at 6:00pm for complimentary appetizers and chats with like-minded friends. You’ll also get 10-percent off food and non-alcoholic drinks throughout the evening.

Lightning talks explained

Lightning talks are a series of 5 minute presentations from a wide range of professionals and academics from the HCI, UX, and Design worlds. Our speakers will be talking about what interests and excites them outside of their everyday work. Whether it’s technology, art, or history, we’re here to find out what people are passionate about! No matter what your interests, we guarantee you’ll learn something new.

Presenters

Shamima Khan, Director, User Experience at Radiant Design Studio

Michelangelo – Artistic genius and an original UX designer

  • Michelangelo, the world famous artistic genius, created the statue of David and the Sistine Chapel ceiling among many other incredible works of art. But there’s another, little-known side to Michelangelo. This talk will briefly discuss the UX processes he followed hundreds of years ago as a renowned painter, architect, and sculptor.

Tamyca Dorrington, UX Designer, Service Canada

Gardening as an instrument of grace

  • We live in an era of instant gratification. We see something, we want it, we get it. The idea of waiting for something is almost inconceivable in modern society. How can we learn to be more patient people? Tending to a garden, even just a few houseplants can help cultivate an appreciation for the things in life that take a little longer to come to fruition.

Gillian Massel, Content Strategist, Shopify

The art of the insult

  • As an arrogant teenager, I was drawn to Shakespeare’s insults as a way of expressing my contempt. Now, as an adult, I admire the Bard’s inventive invective for it’s creativity, playfulness, and demonstration of master wordsmithery. In this brief talk, I’ll explore some of Shakespeare’s finest insults and explain the literary technique behind his greatest abuses.

Lina Bonapace, Director of UX Research, Macadamian

I am a map addict!

  • I love maps and have surrounded myself with them in various forms since my childhood. I’ve found them useful to follow, beautiful to look at and fun to immerse myself in. I’d sit in a plane and stare at the flight routes dreaming of my next exotic destination, I’d follow the drawing of the golf course on the scorecard to see what obstacle lay ahead, and I’d search for the places my family came from in a beautifully coloured atlas. In this lightning talk I will share with you my fascination in creating maps in both my personal and professional life.

Monica Zaczynski, User Experience Design and Research Consultant, Telus Health

Just start already: Lessons learned from my pet Sourdough Starter

  • Beginning with an interest in exploring foods and health, I’ll share my my journey, partially fuelled by a stubborn determination, to make an amazing loaf of bread. What I learned from several failed attempts is that, making a sourdough starter is more than reading the recipe and following instructions. It can teach us all about learning how to read and respond to our environment, how to be patient and mostly importantly to experiment and have fun.

Joel Kapongo, CEO and Co-founder, Tumello

Parallels Between UX and Music

  • Over the past few centuries music theory has undergone lots of evolution. Given that music and user experience design are both creative processes, we can draw parallels between these two disciplines. There’s a lot UX designers can learn from music! In this talk, Joel, will present these parallels in a fun, relatable, and easy to understand manner.

Scott Duncan, Senior Consultant, Systemscope

Chimeda: Reconciliation on the Ottawa River

  • Since 2013, I have organized “Chimeda”, an annual canoe trip with the Algonquin community of Kitigan Zibi, and my own village of Wakefield. Each year, we paddle the Gatineau River to Ottawa. The trip was borne of a real desire among people in my community and Kitigan Zibi to get to know each other, and to create friendships. At a time when there is so much divisive rhetoric, we are pleased that for Canada’s 150th, our trip will be larger than ever: a potent symbol of reconciliation on the Ottawa River.

Alëna Iouguina, UX Research Lead, Shopify
Anthony Dewar, Co-founder: Ecotonos Design + Manufacturing

Designing collaborative experiences with robots

  • Robots are beginning to work and play side by side with people and present new experiential opportunities at the intersection of human and technology driven cultures. With the help of our Musical Robots we’ll show how today’s robots are not only fully buildable in a home environment, but also smart, adaptable, and possess a great sense of humour. As a result, new research and design practices are emerging to address the virtual and physical interfaces that further blend the line between nature and technology and will make you question what it means to be human.

Hilary Little, Senior UX Designer, CBSA

Green burial

  • After chatting lightheartedly with my daughter one day about what I’d want done after my (hopefully very far off) demise, I realized that none of the traditional options resonated with me. I disliked the idea of buying an expensive casket just to put it in the ground, the idea of chemical embalming just felt wrong and I didn’t want to eternally perch on anyone’s shelf in an urn. What I wanted was something much more in tune with nature. I believe my final request was “just stick me in the ground and plant a tree”. But was that even possible? In this lightening talk, I’ll tell you about green burial, and shed light on some common misperceptions about the traditional way of doing things.

 

AND YOU! That’s right, we’ll be opening up the floor. If you’re up for it, tell us about your own interests or hobbies in a quick 5 minute presentation.

 

When and Where:

This event will take place on Tuesday, December 13th, 6:00 pm at the The Fox & Feather Pub and Grill, located at 283 Elgin St, Ottawa, ON, Canada (foxandfeather.ca).

CapCHI (www.capchi.org) is a social and professional society of people who work as user interface designers, researchers, educators, software developers, web designers, graphic designers and human factors engineers in and around Canada’s National Capital Region. Founded in 1991, CapCHI’s goal is to bring together local professionals interested in how humans and computers interact, in a relaxed and informal atmosphere.

2013-03-19 Avoiding “chartjunk” and “slideuments”: principles for visual presentation of data and findings

Avoiding “chartjunk” and “slideuments”: principles for visual presentation of data and findings

Presented by John Burrett

CapCHI will be hosting our next event on March 19th, again at the Fox & Feather Pub and Grill!

Date: Tuesday March 19th, 2013
Time: doors open at 6:00 pm; talk begins at 6:30 pm
Place: The upstairs room at the Fox & Feather Pub and Grill, located at 283 Elgin St, Ottawa, ON, Canada (foxandfeather.ca).

———–

(NEW) Thanks to everyone who attended this talk! Here is a list of references provided by John:

  • Nancy Duarte – “Resonate” (the best reference from her, especially on the structure and design of presentations) and “Slideology” (older but has more about slide construction); www.duarte.com
  • Stephen Few – “Show me the Numbers” (about the best ways to present data), and “Now You See It” (like Show me the Numbers, but focused more on using the same principles for visual data analysis); www.perceptualedge.com
  • Garr Reynolds – “Presentation zen”, much like Duarte’s stuff, but some additional perspectives; www.garrreynolds.com
  • Edward Tufte – the classic reference is “The Visual Display of Quantitative Information”, but anything by him is good.  He tends to go a bit more to the real minimalist end of the spectrum when it comes to data/non-data ink, etc, and is a bit more on the artistic side.  Well worth it, though. www.edwardtufte.com

———–

Abstract:

The goal of this presentation is to introduce the idea that quantitative facts and findings can be presented, by following some principles, in a way that clarifies and emphasizes the messages in your data. This is done by following some key principles related to how we view and perceive visual information, particularly via data graphics and tables. The presentation also seeks to introduce the idea that verbal/visual presentations, using slides, can also be similarly improved, with an emphasis on avoiding dense wordy slides and designing slides with clarity and flow in mind.

It’s meant to be an introduction to these principles and hopefully a catalyst for analysts, researchers and communicators to learn more.

That offers considerable potential value to government and businesses who should want to communicate clearly, as more and more data becomes available.

Bio:

John Burrett is an Ottawa based consultant in the areas of evaluation, measurement and analysis and in communicating for data based policy development and advocacy.

He has built a successful consulting practice in evaluation and performance management, strategic research and outreach for major government departments and public-good-oriented organizations, as the director of his company, with a major multinational company, and with select partner firms.

John continues developing his practice, studying with leaders in the area of visual analysis and communications and building capabilities with new techniques to measure outcomes and networks.

When and Where:

This event will take place on Tuesday, March 19th, 6:00 pm in the upstairs room at the Fox & Feather Pub and Grill, located at 283 Elgin St, Ottawa, ON, Canada (foxandfeather.ca).

Note: There is no cost for attending this event and prior registration is not required.

CapCHI (www.capchi.org) is a social and professional society of people who work as user interface designers, researchers, educators, software developers, web designers, graphic designers and human factors engineers in and around Canada’s National Capital Region. Founded in 1991, CapCHI’s goal is to bring together local professionals interested in how humans and computers interact, in a relaxed and informal atmosphere.

2012-04-17 Interactional identity: designers and developers making joint work meaningful and effective

Interactional identity: designers and developers making joint work meaningful and effective

Presented by Judith Brown

Date: Tuesday April 17th, 2012
Time: doors open at 6:00 pm; talk begins at 6:30 pm
Place: TheCodeFactory, 246 Queen St., Ottawa, ON, Canada

Abstract:
How does identity enter into software creation work?  We studied collaborating interface designers and software developers engaged in multidisciplinary software creation work on novel software projects with significant user interface design challenges. Twenty-one designers and developers in 8 organizations were interviewed to understand how each specialist viewed their interactions with their fellow team members. We also shadowed most of these designers and developers for a week as they worked. The results of our analysis showed that designers and developers construct unique identities in the process of collaborating that are satisfying personally, provide meaning to their artifact-mediated interactions, and help them to effectively accomplish the work of creating novel software. Our model of interactional identities specifies a number of aspects of joint project work in which an interactional identity is expressed, such as project tensions. We suggest these identities are constructed to bridge a gap between how designers and developers were taught to enact their roles and the demands of project-specific work. We look at specific identities such as the “movie director” designer or the “binder” developer and show how these emerged as a direct response to past and present experiences, as well as touching on 19 others.  We show how people develop more effective interactional identities after about 10 years of experience in the field.  As part of this presentation we will launch a discussion on how practitioners can be encouraged to adopt more effective identities sooner.

Bio:

Judith Brown is a post doctoral fellow at Carleton University in the Human-Oriented Technology Software Research Lab. Judith recently received her PhD in Psychology/Human-Computer Interaction as a result of her field studies of collaborative work on software teams. She is currently engaged in a project for creating team room software for large displays to be used by software teams, another project to enable collaborative security work in data centres, and another to look at how large displays can enable analysis work. Judith was a professor in Computer Science and Software Engineering for 15 years and has many publications in software engineering and HCI. She has 6 years of experience as a developer in the field of telecommunications.

When and Where:

This event will take place on Tuesday, April 17th, 6:00 pm at TheCodeFactory, located at 246 Queen Street, between Bank and Kent, (on the second floor) above the Green Papaya Restaurant. The doors open at 6:00 pm for networking and the talk begins at 6:30 pm.

Note: There is no cost for attending this event and prior registration is not required. Light snacks and refreshments will be served. An informal social gathering will follow at a nearby pub.

CapCHI (www.capchi.org) is a social and professional society of people who work as user interface designers, researchers, educators, software developers, web designers, graphic designers and human factors engineers in and around Canada’s National Capital Region. Founded in 1991, CapCHI’s goal is to bring together local professionals interested in how humans and computers interact, in a relaxed and informal atmosphere.

2012-03-20 Bio-inspired robot sensors and HCIs

Bio-inspired robot sensors and HCIs

Presented by Emil M. Petriu, University of Ottawa

Date: Tuesday March 20th, 2012
Time: doors open at 6:00 pm; talk begins at 6:30 pm
Place: TheCodeFactory, 246 Queen St., Ottawa, ON, Canada

Abstract:
For a long time, engineers have built upon mathematics and natural science principles from mechanics, electricity, and chemistry in order to develop an ever growing variety of more efficient and smarter industrial artefacts and machines, including computers. The time has now arrived to add biology and more specifically, human anatomy, physiology and psychology to the scientific sources of knowledge for engineers to develop a new, bio-inspired, generation of intelligent machines. Advocating this emergent trend, this presentation will discuss a number of relevant issues such as human-robot interaction for symbiotic partnership, bio-inspired neural networks, techniques that enhance human natural capabilities, as well as moral, ethical, theological, legal, and social challenges in a soon to come cyborg-society world.

Bio:

Emil M. Petriu is a Professor and University Research Chair in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Ottawa. His research interests include: soft computing, intelligent sensor systems, robot sensors and perception, and human-computer symbiosis http://www.eecs.uottawa.ca/~petriu/.

When and Where:

This event will take place on Tuesday, March 20th, 6:00 pm at TheCodeFactory, located at 246 Queen Street, between Bank and Kent, (on the second floor) above the Green Papaya Restaurant. The doors open at 6:00 pm for networking and the talk begins at 6:30 pm.

Note: There is no cost for attending this event and prior registration is not required. Light snacks and refreshments will be served. An informal social gathering will follow at a nearby pub.

CapCHI (www.capchi.org) is a social and professional society of people who work as user interface designers, researchers, educators, software developers, web designers, graphic designers and human factors engineers in and around Canada’s National Capital Region. Founded in 1991, CapCHI’s goal is to bring together local professionals interested in how humans and computers interact, in a relaxed and informal atmosphere.

2012-01-17 Think with your hands! Using Lego to capture user requirements

Think with your hands! Using Lego to capture user requirements

Presented by Ellen Grove,
Agile coaching & training,
Organizational transformation,
www.profluence.ca,
masteringtheobvious.wordpress.com (blog)

 

Date: Tuesday January 17, 2012
Time: doors open at 6:00 pm; talk begins at 6:30 pm
Place: TheCodeFactory, 246 Queen St., Ottawa, ON, Canada

Abstract:
Let your hands be the search engine for your brain! LEGO® Serious Play® is a powerful thinking, communicating and problem solving technique that can help you and your team do serious work through structured play activities using a popular and playful 3D modeling toy. Through a facilitated process of building models that, storytelling and reflection, every person at the table is engaged and actively participating in the discussion, whether the topic is individual aspirations, team relationships, developing a new product or solving a wicked organizational problem. Everyone builds and everyone tells their story – all participants have equal opportunity to put their own points of view on the table, unlocking new perspectives and exposing the answers that are already in the room.  LEGO Serious Play has been used successfully for team-building and problem solving in a variety of organizations, from NASA to RBC to academic settings and public utilities.

This presentation will provide a hands-on introduction to LEGO Serious Play, so that you can experience firsthand how using LEGO to do real work unleashes creativity and enables meaningful conversations in a very short time. We will explore how to use this playful technique to collaboratively elicit information about user requirements and strategic design issues using the open source User Requirements with Lego methodology developed by a team at the University of Lugano, Switzerland.

About the Facilitator:

Ellen Grove is an Agile coach who helps teams do better work through coaching them to create the circumstances in which they can work most productively and effectively. Her Agile coaching practice is founded in over 10 years experience leading software testing, development and implementation teams in global enterprises, a passion for exploratory software testing and user-centered design, and a background in community organization. She uses team-building and facilitation approaches to support the transition to collaborative Agile work practices at the team, managerial and corporate levels, and has conquered the challenges of extending Scrum roll-outs to off-shore development partners and multi-site project teams.   Ellen is a StrategicPlay certified facilitator in Lego Serious Play methods.

When and Where:

This event will take place on Tuesday, January 17th, 6:00 pm at TheCodeFactory, located at 246 Queen Street, between Bank and Kent, (on the second floor) above the Green Papaya Restaurant. The doors open at 6:00 pm for networking and the talk begins at 6:30 pm.

Note: There is no cost for attending this event and prior registration is not required. Light snacks and refreshments will be served. An informal social gathering will follow at a nearby pub.

CapCHI (www.capchi.org) is a social and professional society of people who work as user interface designers, researchers, educators, software developers, web designers, graphic designers and human factors engineers in and around Canada’s National Capital Region. Founded in 1991, CapCHI’s goal is to bring together local professionals interested in how humans and computers interact, in a relaxed and informal atmosphere.

2010-09-21 Software Development and Culture: Learning to Play Together

Software Development and Culture: Learning to Play Together
Presented by Robert Biddle, Carleton University

Date: Tuesday September 21, 2010
Time: 6:00pm
Place: TheCodeFactory, 246 Queen St., Ottawa

Abstract:

Software development means collaboration, and increasingly this collaboration must cross boundaries of organizational and national culture. Projects in multi-cultural settings involve countless challenges, including not only collaboration, but also everything from existing project planning and management, and even simple communication. Moreover, software development methods might need to be transformed to work at all. The aim of this talk is introduce models of culture, and to explore the impact of cultural differences on software development processes and methods, especially novel approaches such as agile development. The talk will be organized around a collaborative game to illustrate culture in the software development workplace. The game,‘Cultural Monopoly’ is a novel board game designed for small groups to explore the effects of cultural difference on a development project.

Objectives:

This talk is designed to meet the needs and challenges of software developers working in culturally diverse settings, as well as anyone implementing software methodologies in different cultures. The emphasis of the talk is in understanding the role and impact of cultural differences on software processes and methods. The talk should facilitate the development of participants’ skills to improve effective cross-cultural communication and collaboration in software projects. This talk will provide a broad cultural literacy that enhances software projects conducted in multi- cultural settings and facilitate the adoption of new software development practices in different cultures. We will contribute to the understanding of the function of cultures and diversity in a software development environment.

Format:

Highly interactive, primarily through game-play, especially a custom version of “monopoly” to simulate the software development process.

Audience:

Practitioners, Managers, Educators

Bio:

Robert BiddleRobert Biddle is Professor of Human Computer Interaction at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada: he is on the graduate faculty of both Computer Science and Psychology. He has degrees in Applied Analysis and Computer Science from the University of Waterloo and the University of Canterbury, and has diplomas in both childhood and adult education. His two main research areas are Software Design and Human-Computer Interaction. His current active research projects are in human issues in software development, novel approaches to computer security, and in the design of interactive media such as videogames, wikis, and end-user development environments.

When and Where:

This event will take place on Tuesday, September 21, 6:00pm at TheCodeFactory, located at 246 Queen Street, between Bank and Kent, (on the second floor) above the Green Papaya Restaurant.

Note: there is no cost for attending this event and prior registration is not required. Light snacks and refreshments will be served. An informal social gathering will follow at a nearby pub.

Who:

CapCHI is a social and professional society of people who work as user interface designers, researchers, educators, software developers, web designers, graphic designers and human factors engineers in and around Canada’s National Capital Region. Founded in 1991, CapCHI’s goal is to bring together local professionals interested in how humans and computers interact, in a relaxed and informal atmosphere.