2015-11-17 Innovation in Canada – A Panel Discussion in Celebration of World Usability Day 2015

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In celebration of this year’s theme for World Usability Day, CapCHI presents a panel discussion on innovation!

Date: Tuesday November 17th, 2015
Time: doors open at 6:00 pm; presentation begins at 6:30 pm
Place: The upstairs room at The Fox & Feather Pub and Grill, located at 283 Elgin St, Ottawa, ON, Canada (foxandfeather.ca).

Registration (Free!): We request that you pre-register via Eventbrite, but it is not required to attend: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/capchi-event-innovation-in-canada-a-panel-discussion-in-celebration-of-world-usability-day-2015-tickets-19266455487

What:

Innovation is viewed as a vital ingredient for helping Canada become more productive and positioning us to compete on the world stage. Our economic health relies heavily on and is greatly affected by movements in the prices of natural resources. Faced with recent declining prices for these resources, businesses have had to make tough decisions regarding the allocation of labour and capital. Can innovation help our country become more productive? CapCHI has reached out to a few local experts to explore the topic of innovation and how it can impact our economy.

  • Can innovation in User Experience help both private and public organizations bring better products and/or services to the market and improve Canada’s overall productivity and competitiveness?
  • Are there opportunities to enhance the impact of these products/services?
  • Can Canadian companies scale to bring these products/services on the world market?
  • What are some of the issues/challenges that prevent organizations from innovating?
  • …and what is innovation?

Moderated by Carleton University’s Bruce Tsuji, our panel of experts will try to shed some light onto these questions.

Moderator:

Bruce Tsuji (Teacher, Researcher, and MOOC Master at Carleton University’s Department of Psychology) has a BSc from Trent, an MA from Waterloo and a Ph.D. from Carleton. He has 25 years in user interface design, usability testing, product management, sales, business development, and marketing. Some of the technologies with which he has dealt include telephony, voice applications, voice recognition, wireless, business intelligence, data mining, customer relationship management, and network security. Bruce is a co-inventor on eight US and Canadian patents.

Panel of Experts:

Scott Plewes (VP, UX Design at Macadamian) has worked for almost 25 years in user experience design. After earning a Masters from Queens University, he did UX design for Bell Northern Research and Nortel; before it was even called UX design. He has been a UX consultant since he co-founded Maskery in 2001 and then subsequently joined Macadamian in 2006 when Maskery was acquired. Joining Macadamian, his focus was to find a way to integrate engineering and UX design to find ways to keep UX design a focus on the product all the way into the market, and not just in the design spec.

Alvaro Vargas (Marketing Advisor and User Experience Design, Government of Canada) is a user experience (UX) designer, working for the Government of Canada as a UX designer on internet and intranet communications projects.  His approach to UX comes from three disciplines: advertising, graphic design, and anthropology. The connecting principle between them is a genuine interest in people, and the interfaces of people-to-people, people-to-technology, and people-to-processes. He sees UX as an outcome, not a process.

Shaun Illingworth (Partner, Managing Director at Akendi): Ensuring research is relevant and actionable is what drives Shaun day-to-day.  With over 17 years of experience in both enterprise and startup technology companies, Shaun is an experienced business strategist, creative thinker and market research executive with a rare focus on user-centered design and its resulting business value.  Shaun began his career in Boston as a product and market research consultant; he holds a Ph.D. in experimental psychology from Northeastern University and is a professional moderator and workshop facilitator.

Tim Moore (Consultant at Ergosum Ltd.) has had an eclectic career centered on human factor engineering.  Starting in 1970, he worked for 6 years in one of the first research groups on human computer interaction.  He then worked for 5 years for one of the first consumer product ergonomic research groups and was the sole user interface and ergonomics consultant for L.M.Ericsson, the Swedish telecommunications company more recently associated with Sony.  He obtained a PhD for a project to design a new International telephone exchange for Ericsson.

When and Where:

This event will take place on Tuesday, November 17th, 6:00 pm in the upstairs room at the The Fox & Feather Pub and Grill, located at 283 Elgin St, Ottawa, ON, Canada (foxandfeather.ca).

There will be free appetizers and our partners at The Fox & Feather will provide attendees with a 10 percent discount on food and non-alcoholic drinks.

CapCHI (www.capchi.org) is a social and professional society of people who work as user interface designers, researchers, educators, software developers, web designers, graphic designers and human factors engineers in and around Canada’s National Capital Region. Founded in 1991, CapCHI’s goal is to bring together local professionals interested in how humans and computers interact, in a relaxed and informal atmosphere.

2012-04-17 Interactional identity: designers and developers making joint work meaningful and effective

Interactional identity: designers and developers making joint work meaningful and effective

Presented by Judith Brown

Date: Tuesday April 17th, 2012
Time: doors open at 6:00 pm; talk begins at 6:30 pm
Place: TheCodeFactory, 246 Queen St., Ottawa, ON, Canada

Abstract:
How does identity enter into software creation work?  We studied collaborating interface designers and software developers engaged in multidisciplinary software creation work on novel software projects with significant user interface design challenges. Twenty-one designers and developers in 8 organizations were interviewed to understand how each specialist viewed their interactions with their fellow team members. We also shadowed most of these designers and developers for a week as they worked. The results of our analysis showed that designers and developers construct unique identities in the process of collaborating that are satisfying personally, provide meaning to their artifact-mediated interactions, and help them to effectively accomplish the work of creating novel software. Our model of interactional identities specifies a number of aspects of joint project work in which an interactional identity is expressed, such as project tensions. We suggest these identities are constructed to bridge a gap between how designers and developers were taught to enact their roles and the demands of project-specific work. We look at specific identities such as the “movie director” designer or the “binder” developer and show how these emerged as a direct response to past and present experiences, as well as touching on 19 others.  We show how people develop more effective interactional identities after about 10 years of experience in the field.  As part of this presentation we will launch a discussion on how practitioners can be encouraged to adopt more effective identities sooner.

Bio:

Judith Brown is a post doctoral fellow at Carleton University in the Human-Oriented Technology Software Research Lab. Judith recently received her PhD in Psychology/Human-Computer Interaction as a result of her field studies of collaborative work on software teams. She is currently engaged in a project for creating team room software for large displays to be used by software teams, another project to enable collaborative security work in data centres, and another to look at how large displays can enable analysis work. Judith was a professor in Computer Science and Software Engineering for 15 years and has many publications in software engineering and HCI. She has 6 years of experience as a developer in the field of telecommunications.

When and Where:

This event will take place on Tuesday, April 17th, 6:00 pm at TheCodeFactory, located at 246 Queen Street, between Bank and Kent, (on the second floor) above the Green Papaya Restaurant. The doors open at 6:00 pm for networking and the talk begins at 6:30 pm.

Note: There is no cost for attending this event and prior registration is not required. Light snacks and refreshments will be served. An informal social gathering will follow at a nearby pub.

CapCHI (www.capchi.org) is a social and professional society of people who work as user interface designers, researchers, educators, software developers, web designers, graphic designers and human factors engineers in and around Canada’s National Capital Region. Founded in 1991, CapCHI’s goal is to bring together local professionals interested in how humans and computers interact, in a relaxed and informal atmosphere.

2012-03-20 Bio-inspired robot sensors and HCIs

Bio-inspired robot sensors and HCIs

Presented by Emil M. Petriu, University of Ottawa

Date: Tuesday March 20th, 2012
Time: doors open at 6:00 pm; talk begins at 6:30 pm
Place: TheCodeFactory, 246 Queen St., Ottawa, ON, Canada

Abstract:
For a long time, engineers have built upon mathematics and natural science principles from mechanics, electricity, and chemistry in order to develop an ever growing variety of more efficient and smarter industrial artefacts and machines, including computers. The time has now arrived to add biology and more specifically, human anatomy, physiology and psychology to the scientific sources of knowledge for engineers to develop a new, bio-inspired, generation of intelligent machines. Advocating this emergent trend, this presentation will discuss a number of relevant issues such as human-robot interaction for symbiotic partnership, bio-inspired neural networks, techniques that enhance human natural capabilities, as well as moral, ethical, theological, legal, and social challenges in a soon to come cyborg-society world.

Bio:

Emil M. Petriu is a Professor and University Research Chair in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Ottawa. His research interests include: soft computing, intelligent sensor systems, robot sensors and perception, and human-computer symbiosis http://www.eecs.uottawa.ca/~petriu/.

When and Where:

This event will take place on Tuesday, March 20th, 6:00 pm at TheCodeFactory, located at 246 Queen Street, between Bank and Kent, (on the second floor) above the Green Papaya Restaurant. The doors open at 6:00 pm for networking and the talk begins at 6:30 pm.

Note: There is no cost for attending this event and prior registration is not required. Light snacks and refreshments will be served. An informal social gathering will follow at a nearby pub.

CapCHI (www.capchi.org) is a social and professional society of people who work as user interface designers, researchers, educators, software developers, web designers, graphic designers and human factors engineers in and around Canada’s National Capital Region. Founded in 1991, CapCHI’s goal is to bring together local professionals interested in how humans and computers interact, in a relaxed and informal atmosphere.

2012-01-17 Think with your hands! Using Lego to capture user requirements

Think with your hands! Using Lego to capture user requirements

Presented by Ellen Grove,
Agile coaching & training,
Organizational transformation,
www.profluence.ca,
masteringtheobvious.wordpress.com (blog)

 

Date: Tuesday January 17, 2012
Time: doors open at 6:00 pm; talk begins at 6:30 pm
Place: TheCodeFactory, 246 Queen St., Ottawa, ON, Canada

Abstract:
Let your hands be the search engine for your brain! LEGO® Serious Play® is a powerful thinking, communicating and problem solving technique that can help you and your team do serious work through structured play activities using a popular and playful 3D modeling toy. Through a facilitated process of building models that, storytelling and reflection, every person at the table is engaged and actively participating in the discussion, whether the topic is individual aspirations, team relationships, developing a new product or solving a wicked organizational problem. Everyone builds and everyone tells their story – all participants have equal opportunity to put their own points of view on the table, unlocking new perspectives and exposing the answers that are already in the room.  LEGO Serious Play has been used successfully for team-building and problem solving in a variety of organizations, from NASA to RBC to academic settings and public utilities.

This presentation will provide a hands-on introduction to LEGO Serious Play, so that you can experience firsthand how using LEGO to do real work unleashes creativity and enables meaningful conversations in a very short time. We will explore how to use this playful technique to collaboratively elicit information about user requirements and strategic design issues using the open source User Requirements with Lego methodology developed by a team at the University of Lugano, Switzerland.

About the Facilitator:

Ellen Grove is an Agile coach who helps teams do better work through coaching them to create the circumstances in which they can work most productively and effectively. Her Agile coaching practice is founded in over 10 years experience leading software testing, development and implementation teams in global enterprises, a passion for exploratory software testing and user-centered design, and a background in community organization. She uses team-building and facilitation approaches to support the transition to collaborative Agile work practices at the team, managerial and corporate levels, and has conquered the challenges of extending Scrum roll-outs to off-shore development partners and multi-site project teams.   Ellen is a StrategicPlay certified facilitator in Lego Serious Play methods.

When and Where:

This event will take place on Tuesday, January 17th, 6:00 pm at TheCodeFactory, located at 246 Queen Street, between Bank and Kent, (on the second floor) above the Green Papaya Restaurant. The doors open at 6:00 pm for networking and the talk begins at 6:30 pm.

Note: There is no cost for attending this event and prior registration is not required. Light snacks and refreshments will be served. An informal social gathering will follow at a nearby pub.

CapCHI (www.capchi.org) is a social and professional society of people who work as user interface designers, researchers, educators, software developers, web designers, graphic designers and human factors engineers in and around Canada’s National Capital Region. Founded in 1991, CapCHI’s goal is to bring together local professionals interested in how humans and computers interact, in a relaxed and informal atmosphere.