2015-04-18 CHI 2015: Crossings

CHI 2015: Crossings

April 18-23, 2015

Seoul, Korea

http://chi2015.acm.org

For over 30 years, the CHI conference (pronounced ‘kai’) has attracted the world’s leading researchers and practitioners in the field of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) from businesses and universities to share ground-breaking research and innovations related to how humans interact with digital technologies. The Association for Computing Machinery’s (ACM) CHI conference is the world’s premiere conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, presenting a highly selective showcase of the very best advances across the disciplines of computer science, cognitive psychology, design, social science, human factors, artificial intelligence, graphics, visualization, multi-media design and other disciplines.

The theme for CHI 2015 is “Crossings”: crossing borders, crossing boundaries, crossing disciplines, crossing people and technology, crossing past and future, crossing physical and digital, crossing art and science, … crossing you and me.

Cross into new territory by joining us in Seoul, Korea, one of the world’s most dynamic cities and the center of emerging trends in culture, technology and design. For those who create and evaluate new systems, CHI 2015 will be a central cross-point to find the latest in research and design of the world’s most innovative technologies.

2015-08-09 SIGGRAPH 2015 Xroads of Discovery

The 42nd International Conference and Exhibition on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques.

http://s2015.siggraph.org

Important Dates:

SIGGRAPH 2015, Los Angeles, CA, USA
Conference: 09 to 13 August 2015
Exhibition: 11 to 13 August 2015

The annual SIGGRAPH conference is a five-day interdisciplinary educational experience in the latest computer graphics and interactive techniques including a three-day commercial exhibition that attracts hundreds of exhibitors from around the world.

2012-11-28 SIGGRAPH Asia 2012

SIGGRAPH Asia 2012

The 5th ACM SIGGRAPH Conference and Exhibition on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques in Asia will take place from 28 November – 1 December 2012 in Singapore, which was also host city of the inaugural edition in 2008.

SIGGRAPH Asia 2012 is expected to draw more than 7,000 professionals from 52 countries to Singapore.

For more information, visit http://www.siggraph.org/asia2012/

Early registration ends on October 15, 2012.

 

 

2012-06-19 A Sketch-based game for learning images

A Sketch-based game for learning images

Presented by Dr. David Mould, Carleton University

Date: Tuesday June 19th, 2012
Time: doors open at 6:00 pm; talk begins at 6:30 pm
Place: TheCodeFactory, 246 Queen St., Ottawa, ON, Canada

This month’s event also includes our annual AGM.

Abstract:

This talk describes a game we created, intended to help players learn about annotated images. The game activity involved searching the image for hidden glyphs, which once found had to be traced by the player. Each glyph was associated with a fact about the image, revealed once the glyph was discovered. The game increased interest and learning dramatically compared to a traditional textbook view, which we attribute to enlisting the player’s active attention and spatial memory.

Bio:

Dr. Mould is an Associate Professor at Carleton University, which he joined in 2008. Previously he was a faculty member at the University of Saskatchewan. His PhD is from the University of Toronto, where he was part of the Dynamic Graphics Project. His research interests include computer games, procedural modeling, and artistic rendering.

When and Where:

This event will take place on Tuesday, June 19th, 6:00 pm at TheCodeFactory, located at 246 Queen Street, between Bank and Kent, (on the second floor) above the Green Papaya Restaurant. The doors open at 6:00 pm for networking and the talk begins at 6:30 pm.

Note: There is no cost for attending this event and prior registration is not required. Light snacks and refreshments will be served. An informal social gathering will follow at a nearby pub.

CapCHI (www.capchi.org) is a social and professional society of people who work as user interface designers, researchers, educators, software developers, web designers, graphic designers and human factors engineers in and around Canada’s National Capital Region. Founded in 1991, CapCHI’s goal is to bring together local professionals interested in how humans and computers interact, in a relaxed and informal atmosphere.

2012-04-17 Interactional identity: designers and developers making joint work meaningful and effective

Interactional identity: designers and developers making joint work meaningful and effective

Presented by Judith Brown

Date: Tuesday April 17th, 2012
Time: doors open at 6:00 pm; talk begins at 6:30 pm
Place: TheCodeFactory, 246 Queen St., Ottawa, ON, Canada

Abstract:
How does identity enter into software creation work?  We studied collaborating interface designers and software developers engaged in multidisciplinary software creation work on novel software projects with significant user interface design challenges. Twenty-one designers and developers in 8 organizations were interviewed to understand how each specialist viewed their interactions with their fellow team members. We also shadowed most of these designers and developers for a week as they worked. The results of our analysis showed that designers and developers construct unique identities in the process of collaborating that are satisfying personally, provide meaning to their artifact-mediated interactions, and help them to effectively accomplish the work of creating novel software. Our model of interactional identities specifies a number of aspects of joint project work in which an interactional identity is expressed, such as project tensions. We suggest these identities are constructed to bridge a gap between how designers and developers were taught to enact their roles and the demands of project-specific work. We look at specific identities such as the “movie director” designer or the “binder” developer and show how these emerged as a direct response to past and present experiences, as well as touching on 19 others.  We show how people develop more effective interactional identities after about 10 years of experience in the field.  As part of this presentation we will launch a discussion on how practitioners can be encouraged to adopt more effective identities sooner.

Bio:

Judith Brown is a post doctoral fellow at Carleton University in the Human-Oriented Technology Software Research Lab. Judith recently received her PhD in Psychology/Human-Computer Interaction as a result of her field studies of collaborative work on software teams. She is currently engaged in a project for creating team room software for large displays to be used by software teams, another project to enable collaborative security work in data centres, and another to look at how large displays can enable analysis work. Judith was a professor in Computer Science and Software Engineering for 15 years and has many publications in software engineering and HCI. She has 6 years of experience as a developer in the field of telecommunications.

When and Where:

This event will take place on Tuesday, April 17th, 6:00 pm at TheCodeFactory, located at 246 Queen Street, between Bank and Kent, (on the second floor) above the Green Papaya Restaurant. The doors open at 6:00 pm for networking and the talk begins at 6:30 pm.

Note: There is no cost for attending this event and prior registration is not required. Light snacks and refreshments will be served. An informal social gathering will follow at a nearby pub.

CapCHI (www.capchi.org) is a social and professional society of people who work as user interface designers, researchers, educators, software developers, web designers, graphic designers and human factors engineers in and around Canada’s National Capital Region. Founded in 1991, CapCHI’s goal is to bring together local professionals interested in how humans and computers interact, in a relaxed and informal atmosphere.

2012-03-20 Bio-inspired robot sensors and HCIs

Bio-inspired robot sensors and HCIs

Presented by Emil M. Petriu, University of Ottawa

Date: Tuesday March 20th, 2012
Time: doors open at 6:00 pm; talk begins at 6:30 pm
Place: TheCodeFactory, 246 Queen St., Ottawa, ON, Canada

Abstract:
For a long time, engineers have built upon mathematics and natural science principles from mechanics, electricity, and chemistry in order to develop an ever growing variety of more efficient and smarter industrial artefacts and machines, including computers. The time has now arrived to add biology and more specifically, human anatomy, physiology and psychology to the scientific sources of knowledge for engineers to develop a new, bio-inspired, generation of intelligent machines. Advocating this emergent trend, this presentation will discuss a number of relevant issues such as human-robot interaction for symbiotic partnership, bio-inspired neural networks, techniques that enhance human natural capabilities, as well as moral, ethical, theological, legal, and social challenges in a soon to come cyborg-society world.

Bio:

Emil M. Petriu is a Professor and University Research Chair in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Ottawa. His research interests include: soft computing, intelligent sensor systems, robot sensors and perception, and human-computer symbiosis http://www.eecs.uottawa.ca/~petriu/.

When and Where:

This event will take place on Tuesday, March 20th, 6:00 pm at TheCodeFactory, located at 246 Queen Street, between Bank and Kent, (on the second floor) above the Green Papaya Restaurant. The doors open at 6:00 pm for networking and the talk begins at 6:30 pm.

Note: There is no cost for attending this event and prior registration is not required. Light snacks and refreshments will be served. An informal social gathering will follow at a nearby pub.

CapCHI (www.capchi.org) is a social and professional society of people who work as user interface designers, researchers, educators, software developers, web designers, graphic designers and human factors engineers in and around Canada’s National Capital Region. Founded in 1991, CapCHI’s goal is to bring together local professionals interested in how humans and computers interact, in a relaxed and informal atmosphere.

2012-01-17 Think with your hands! Using Lego to capture user requirements

Think with your hands! Using Lego to capture user requirements

Presented by Ellen Grove,
Agile coaching & training,
Organizational transformation,
www.profluence.ca,
masteringtheobvious.wordpress.com (blog)

 

Date: Tuesday January 17, 2012
Time: doors open at 6:00 pm; talk begins at 6:30 pm
Place: TheCodeFactory, 246 Queen St., Ottawa, ON, Canada

Abstract:
Let your hands be the search engine for your brain! LEGO® Serious Play® is a powerful thinking, communicating and problem solving technique that can help you and your team do serious work through structured play activities using a popular and playful 3D modeling toy. Through a facilitated process of building models that, storytelling and reflection, every person at the table is engaged and actively participating in the discussion, whether the topic is individual aspirations, team relationships, developing a new product or solving a wicked organizational problem. Everyone builds and everyone tells their story – all participants have equal opportunity to put their own points of view on the table, unlocking new perspectives and exposing the answers that are already in the room.  LEGO Serious Play has been used successfully for team-building and problem solving in a variety of organizations, from NASA to RBC to academic settings and public utilities.

This presentation will provide a hands-on introduction to LEGO Serious Play, so that you can experience firsthand how using LEGO to do real work unleashes creativity and enables meaningful conversations in a very short time. We will explore how to use this playful technique to collaboratively elicit information about user requirements and strategic design issues using the open source User Requirements with Lego methodology developed by a team at the University of Lugano, Switzerland.

About the Facilitator:

Ellen Grove is an Agile coach who helps teams do better work through coaching them to create the circumstances in which they can work most productively and effectively. Her Agile coaching practice is founded in over 10 years experience leading software testing, development and implementation teams in global enterprises, a passion for exploratory software testing and user-centered design, and a background in community organization. She uses team-building and facilitation approaches to support the transition to collaborative Agile work practices at the team, managerial and corporate levels, and has conquered the challenges of extending Scrum roll-outs to off-shore development partners and multi-site project teams.   Ellen is a StrategicPlay certified facilitator in Lego Serious Play methods.

When and Where:

This event will take place on Tuesday, January 17th, 6:00 pm at TheCodeFactory, located at 246 Queen Street, between Bank and Kent, (on the second floor) above the Green Papaya Restaurant. The doors open at 6:00 pm for networking and the talk begins at 6:30 pm.

Note: There is no cost for attending this event and prior registration is not required. Light snacks and refreshments will be served. An informal social gathering will follow at a nearby pub.

CapCHI (www.capchi.org) is a social and professional society of people who work as user interface designers, researchers, educators, software developers, web designers, graphic designers and human factors engineers in and around Canada’s National Capital Region. Founded in 1991, CapCHI’s goal is to bring together local professionals interested in how humans and computers interact, in a relaxed and informal atmosphere.